Archive for the ‘eastern christianity’ Tag

The Council of Manazkert (726)   Leave a comment

Saint Mark’s Monastery, Jerusalem, № 169 mostly contains homilies in Garšūnī, but at the beginning (ff. 4v-8r) there is an excerpt, in Syriac, from the Chronicle of Michael the Great, book 11 of chapter 20, on the Council of Manazkert (or Manzikert; see here for other forms of the name) convened in 726 by Catholicos Yovhannēs Ōjnec’i the Philosopher with Syriac Orthodox Patriarch Athanasios III. The title is “On the Unity Effected by Patriarch Athanasios and Catholicos John of the Armenians against the Heresy of Maximos that has Spread Abroad, and the Negation of the Phrase ‘Who was crucified for us.'” Neither Michael nor the title Chronicle are specifically mentioned here, however. This manuscript was copied outside of Amid/Diyarbakır; the date in the colophon seems to be 1092 AG, which is certainly wrong and probably a mistake for 2092 AG, so May 1781.

SMMJ 169, f. 4v

SMMJ 169, f. 4v

My friend and colleague, Ed Mathews, in his Armenian Commentary on Genesis attributed to Ephrem the Syrian, CSCO 573, (Louvain, 1998), pp. xlvii-xlviii, briefly discusses this council as follows:

It is fairly well known that a council of Manazkert, referred to by a number of historians, was convened in 726, by the great Armenian Kat‘ołikos Yovhannēs Ōjnec‘i, also known as the Philosopher (Arm., իմաստասէր) in order to quiet this dispute and come to some sort of union with the Syrian Church. This council was attended by a number of Armenian bishops and six Syrian bishops to try to effect a union between the two churches, and particularly, to find some common ground whereby each might suppress the more radical branch of Monophysitism as practiced by followers of Julian of Halicarnassus, who maintained the incorruptibility of the body of Christ. The Armenian historians, Step‘annos Asołik, Samuēl Anec‘i, Step‘annos Ōrbelian, and Kirakos Ganiakec‘i do little more than mention the council at all and, like the other historians just mentioned, seems far more interested in the personal appearance of Ōjnec‘i, being enthralled with his elaborate garments and even more with his gold-speckled beard. Clearly then, this council left no real lasting impression in the Armenian church.

As for Syriac sources on this council, as Mathews points out, Barhebraeus’ subsequent account (Chron. Eccl. 1.299-304) is based on that in Michael’s Chronicle, and there is also Dionysius b. Ṣalibi’s Against the Armenians. The bishop of Ḥarrān, Symeon of the Olives, associated with the Monastery of Mor Gabriel, attended the Council (cf. Brock “Fenqitho of the Monastery of Mor Gabriel in Tur ‘Abdin,” Ostkirchliche Studien 28 (1979): 168-182, here 177).

On the name of the place itself, Մանազկերտ, see Hübschmann, Die altarmenische Ortsnamen, 328, 330, 449-450, and Toumanoff, Studies in Christian Caucasian History, p. 218, n. 253, who points to the name of the Urartian king Menua as the source of the place-name. We may also note the important battle fought there in 1071, with the Byzantine army defeated by the Seljuks.

 

Gallery of scholars   Leave a comment

I’ve just published a gallery of scholars (also available at the top of the page) who have worked in the fields of the languages and literature of eastern Christianity. I’ve not listed scholars who are still living. I’m sure I’ve failed to include some people who should be here, so if you have any suggestions for additions, please let me know. Also, I could find no photograph of Georg Graf, and I would be grateful to anyone who will point me to one.

A simple colophon in Gǝʿǝz   Leave a comment

I have often enough here referred to colophons in Syriac and Arabic, but here is a simple example of one in Gǝʿǝz, from The Beheading of John the Baptist in EMML 2514 (written in the 1380s CE), f. 43r.

EMML 2514, f. 43r

EMML 2514, f. 43r

In English:

Finished is the Combat [gädl] of the holy and elect John. May his prayer and blessing protect us forever and ever, amen!

May Christ have mercy in the kingdom of heaven on the one who has copied it, the one who has commissioned its copying, the one who has read it, and the one who has heard its words, through the prayer of the holy virgin, Mary, John the Baptist, and all the saints and martyrs, forever and ever, amen.

The operative vocabulary here is:

  • täfäṣṣämä to be completed
  • ṣäafä to write
  • aṣḥafä to have someone write
  • anbäbä to read
  • sämʿa to hear

And, as usual, there is a wish that this or that saint’s prayer (ṣälot) and blessing (bäräkät) protect (ʿaqäbä) the scribe, etc.

A typological study of colophons in eastern Christian manuscripts from all the languages has, as far as I know, yet to be written, but it would be a worthwhile topic of investigation.

Hagiography among the EMML manuscripts   Leave a comment

Results of the EMML project, begun in 1973 to photograph mss in Ethiopia, include the availability at HMML of several thousand microfilmed manuscripts in Gǝʿǝz (and Amharic). The first catalog appeared in 1975 at the hands of William Macomber, and he and Getatchew Haile would go on individually or together to produce ten more, with vol. 10 appearing in 1993 and vol. 11 now essentially finished but not yet published. Data from these catalogs are available in Oliver, though in less detail than in the printed catalogs. Later this summer a small conference will take place at HMML to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the project.

EMML 141, f. 143v. Barsoma.

EMML 141, f. 143v. Barsoma.

With that many mss together one place, it is natural to consider the makeup of this meta-collection made up of many smaller collections throughout Ethiopia in terms of genre. Hagiography being one of my interests, that’s where I’m focusing. Gǝʿǝz hagiography shares features with hagiography in other language traditions of eastern Christianity, and there are very many texts found in Gǝʿǝz hagiography that are known in Coptic, Syriac, Arabic, Armenian, etc., and, of course, Greek. Ethiopian Christian literature also has its own saints, too, that are wholly unknown in other traditions. Traditions and stories associated with these saints are recounted briefly in the synaxarion (sǝnkǝssar), but also in longer vitae and martyrdom texts (gädl, pl. gädlat; sämaʿt or sǝmǝʿ), as well as texts dedicated to a saint’s miracles (täʾammǝr). Angels and prophets also figure as saints in Gǝʿǝz hagiography, and homilies (dǝrsan, pl. dǝrsanat) are dedicated to particular saints. With this little prelude given, let’s turn to the EMML collection itself. (See the bibliography below for basic surveys of topics in Gǝʿǝz hagiography.)

Based on the printed catalogs of vols. 1-10, here is a list of the manuscripts containing hagiographic materials by sub-genre of hagiography. Many manuscripts are hagiographic collections and thus contain a number, sometimes a great number, of hagiographic texts, while a few of the manuscripts have only an isolated hagiographic work or two. There is naturally some overlap of sub-genre: for example, a martyrdom text may well contain miracles. The counts for each volume given below are based on these separate categories, that is, a few mss are counted more than once if they have texts in more than one category. I have combined the categories of the catalog indices “Acts of Martyrs and Saints” and “Miracles” under one heading here: “Vitae, Martyrdoms, and Miracles”. As mentioned above, the printed catalogs have more detail, but basic information about the hitherto cataloged EMML mss will be found in the online catalog, searchable by EMML no. here.

VOL. 1 (64 mss)

  • Vitae, Martyrdoms, and Miracles (34 mss) 2 4 5 11 22 24 54 63 64 69 76 79 80 87 88 119 141 142 144 150 167 168 193 206 208 213 217 227 228 229 246 247 296 297
  • Homilies for Angels (9 mss) 28 41 44 54 60 70 79 144 273
  • Synaxaria (21 mss) 7 8 18 37 82 90 118 121 132 146 149 165 197 210 241 272 280 283 288 289 295

VOL. 2 (99 mss)

  • Vitae, Martyrdoms, and Miracles (52 mss) 303 319 327 329 332 382 384 392 402 412 415 426 430 453 463 486 492 499 501 513 519 529 537 544 547 551 568 578 583 593 598 604 606 607 612 613 615 617 621 623 633 642 644 653 654 665 666 672 676 682 683 700
  • Homilies for Angels (17 mss) 301 308 314 317 327 367 381 421 424 428 445 530 531 569 570 645 646
  • Homilies for Christ and the Virgin Mary (9 mss) 353 357 516 519 537 543 555 571 621
  • Synaxaria (21 mss) 365 383 385 408 409 410 439 462 465 487 489 506 560 561 564 577 579 601 663 681 684

VOL. 3 (77 mss)

  • Vitae, Martyrdoms, and Miracles (49 mss) 701 709 712 722 728 730 748 758 760 766 774 776 777 782 793 797 805 806 813 814 818 820 836 839 863 867 873 875 876 885 887 890 891 894 896 901 903 912 920 921 929 932 933 936 962 981 1052 1088 1095
  • Homilies for Angels (6 mss) 702 763 815 865 957 1029
  • Homilies for Christ and the Virgin Mary (6 mss) 670 744 766 771 785 871
  • Synaxaria (16 mss) 713 715 740 741 742 743 754 770 809 811 854 855 878 879 944 997
EMML 1479, f. 84v, Gädl of Sergius and Bacchus

EMML 1479, f. 84v, Gädl of Sergius and Bacchus.

VOL. 4 (54 mss)

  • Vitae, Martyrdoms, and Miracles (31 mss) 1122 1126 1140 1156 1180 1208 1211 1218 1220 1302 1303 1304 1305 1323 1325 1326 1338 1344 1356 1363 1366 1371 1385 1433 1440 1453 1479 1482 1487 1496 1497
  • Homilies for Angels (10 mss) 1129 1133 1143 1299 1311 1333 1335 1433 1464 1480
  • Homilies for God, Christ, and the Virgin Mary (6 mss) 1113 1120 1138 1194 1212 1451
  • Synaxaria (7 mss) 1115 1117 1172 1175 1176 1317 1320

VOL. 5 (112 mss)

  • Vitae, Martyrdoms, and Miracles (74 mss) 1512 1513 1526 1528 1553 1563 1569 1572 1573 1581 1584 1593 1606 1610 1611 1612 1614 1616 1617 1628 1630 1635 1636 1657 1673 1674 1688 1690 1692 1734 1735 1758 1763 1766 1767 1772 1773 1779 1782 1783 1790 1799 1824 1825 1826 1827 1833 1834 1837 1838 1840 1844 1857 1874 1877 1882 1885 1887 1920 1925 1931 1934 1939 1940 1946 1953 1960 1961 1963 1965 1974 1978 1992 1998
  • Homilies for Angels (13 mss) 1609 1631 1719 1720 1724 1802 1829 1833 1835 1841 1896 1925 1942
  • Homilies for God, Christ, and the Virgin Mary (13 mss) 1525 1553 1582 1779 1833 1840 1860 1882 1885 1914 1956 1974 1998
  • Synaxaria (12 mss) 1615 1622 1623 1624 1852 1853 1854 1873 1875 1976 1977 1981

VOL. 6 (125 mss)

  • Vitae, Martyrdoms, and Miracles (73 mss) 2007 2023 2034 2037 2039 2041 2048 2050 2052 2056 2058 2059 2060 2066 2084 2087 2107 2134 2137 2142 2151 2169 2171 2180 2189 2190 2196 2197 2208 2220 2221 2229 2233 2248 2249 2251 2255 2261 2266 2270 2275 2282 2297 2300 2303 2308 2319 2322 2325 2326 2337 2349 2353 2366 2371 2374 2378 2392 2406 2408 2409 2419 2424 2444 2445 2451 2454 2462 2463 2466 2485 2488 2495
  • Homilies for Angels (24 mss) 2005 2007 2087 2089 2102 2107 2134 2196 2200 2229 2237 2254 2291 2293 2303 2308 2371 2373 2381 2389 2413 2486 2491 2495
  • Homilies for God, Christ, and the Virgin Mary (16 mss) 2040 2041 2044 2205 2319 2323 2338 2345 2375 2444 2451 2454 2458 2459 2461 2484
  • Synaxaria (12 mss) 2001 2013 2015 2022 2054 2141 2176 2347 2364 2365 2427 2428

VOL. 7 (137 mss)

  • Vitae, Martyrdoms, and Miracles (103 mss) 2504 2513 2514 2524 2536 2550 2552 2563 2573 2577 2582 2593 2599 2601 2608 2610 2620 2621 2626 2628 2634 2639 2643 2646 2655 2660 2670 2672 2675 2682 2685 2686 2692 2698 2703 2710 2711 2715 2717 2719 2720 2730 2732 2733 2739 2740 2749 2752 2758 2764 2768 2774 2779 2782 2784 2795 2796 2800 2802 2804 2805 2807 2812 2828 2831 2834 2836 2846 2847 2859 2860 2861 2862 2865 2867 2869 2880 2891 2893 2894 2895 2898 2902 2903 2905 2911 2912 2913 2914 2919 2925 2928 2938 2949 2952 2954 2964 2967 2968 2970 2972 2995 2999
  • Homilies for Angels (15 mss) 2506 2572 2639 2644 2656 2669 2701 2744 2779 2808 2865 2888 2904 2943 2958
  • Homilies for God, Christ, and the Virgin Mary (10 mss) 2524 2584 2631 2655 2717 2814 2860 2902 2923 2998
  • Synaxaria (9 mss) 2516 2530 2694 2824 2856 2951 2953 2997 3000

VOL. 8 (155 mss)

  • Vitae, Martyrdoms, and Miracles (94 mss) 3005 3014 3016 3031 3034 3049 3051 3052 3058 3059 3061 3065 3076 3077 3079 3090 3093 3103 3109 3117 3125 3132 3133 3142 3143 3149 3153 3156 3165 3170 3172 3174 3194 3195 3202 3205 3210 3211 3219 3221 3225 3229 3248 3249 3275 3284 3288 3289 3290 3291 3293 3303 3305 3306 3309 3317 3321 3326 3329 3330 3337 3341 3345 3359 3368 3378  3388 3407 3410 3413 3417 3418 3419 3420 3421 3428 3430 3431 3436 3442 3445 3446 3447 3454 3455 3456 3469 3472 3474 3475 3479 3492 3496 3497
  • Homilies for Angels, Christ, and the Virgin Mary (48 mss) 3005 3016 3022 3032 3034 3052 3058 3077 3125 3142 3156 3157 3186 3194 3196 3199 3200 3212 3215 3221 3239 3248 3249 3251 3284 3290 3301 3305 3314 3341 3359 3396 3409 3410 3412 3417 3418 3420 3428 3436 3442 3445 3446 3447 3456 3469 3472 3479
  • Synaxaria (13 mss) 3008 3033 3035 3048 3062 3096 3101 3155 3376 3379 3380 3387 3416

VOL. 9 (110 mss)

  • Vitae, Martyrdoms, and Miracles (65 mss)  3518 3525 3527 3536 3545 3552 3554 3563 3564 3572 3583 3585 3589 3607 3616 3623 3629 3629 3640 3642 3650 3652 3667 3685 3696 3698 3709 3711 3719 3729 3733 3737 3738 3785 3805 3820 3823 3824 3835 3841 3843 3852 3867 3872 3877 3889 3891 3899 3901 3910 3923 3931 3932 3938 3946 3961 3966 3968 3969 3972 3979 3986 3987 3990 3991
  • Homilies for Angels, Christ, and the Virgin Mary (31 mss) 3916 3527 3529 3546 3580 3589 3591 3626 3627 3629 3639 3663 3711 3723 3731 3771 3774 3777 3816 3829 3836 3843 3873 3891 3899 3938 3962 3966 3972 3986 3998
  • Synaxaria (13 mss) 3511 3512 3513 3616 3620 3621 3804 3891 3966 3982 3984 3985 3986

VOL. 10 (280 mss)

  • Vitae, Martyrdoms, and Miracles (180 mss) 4001 4002 4007 4008 4010 4017 4030 4031 4036 4041 4045 4050 4054 4061 4068 4073 4074 4079 4086 4091 4092 4118 4119 4125 4130 4140 4144 4147 4164 4165 4166 4169 4172 4173 4176 4177 4182 4184 4196 4201 4202 4205 4206 4207 4209 4210 4211 4215 4231 4232 4237 4242 4245 4261 4262 4264 4265 4266 4267 4268 4278 4280 4282 4298 4299 4302 4303 4304 4309 4314 4315 4320 4329 4341 4343 4344 4346 4368 4373 4402 4412 4419 4420 4435 4442 4446 4463 4477 4478 4482 4484 4487 4490 4491 4492 4494 4496 4497 4502 4504 4505 4509 4513 4522 4527 4541 4545 4551 4553 4556 4562 4568 4569 4571 4572 4590 4606 4610 4613 4615 4618 4622 4633 4646 4658 4660 4661 4673 4675 4676 4679 4682 4683 4685 4688 4692 4696 4738 4740 4741 4758 4761 4766 4769 4772 4789 4790 4791 4793 4799 4800 4803 4810 4816 4817 4823 4829 4864 4867 4868 4869 4878 4886 4905 4907 4908 4912 4917 4922 4936 4937 4946 4966 4970 4977 4979 4981 4983 4984 4988
  • Homilies for Angels, Christ, and the Virgin Mary (76 mss)  4002 4017 4048 4063 4074 4082 4086 4129 4130 4133 4138 4147 4169 4173 4184 4206 4209 4212 4231 4242 4268 4280 4285 4298 4314 4315 4320 4357 4362 4368 4400 4413 4420 4429 4481 4502 4504 4505 4510 4533 4534 4541 4545 4560 4601 4610 4633 4639 4646 4676 4685 4692 4702 4721 4726 4732 4734 4772 4773 4781 4800 4810 4811 4814 4817 4820 4842 4864 4868 4869 4872 4934 4937 4940 4979 4983
  • Synaxaria (24 mss)  4022 4169 4176 4208 4272 4273 4274 4355 4398 4436 4445 4525 4652 4737 4785 4786 4900 4901 4910 4930 4956 4965 4972 4997

The total count comes to 1213. Again, this enumeration by hagiographic genre means that there is some duplication, but even allowing for that, there are around 1000 manuscripts with hagiographic content in the cataloged EMML collection. That’s manuscripts: the number of individual texts is, of course, much greater. With this list, there is no doubt as to the remarkable amount of hagiographic mss available within the EMML project; as to the makeup of these mss and the particular witness of the texts contained in them, it’s a case by case question that has so far been investigated only partly. Needless to say, for students of eastern Christian hagiography and of Gǝʿǝz language and literature, there is much work to do in these manuscripts.

Bibliography

See here for the EMML catalogs by Macomber and Getatchew. EA below = Encyclopaedia Aethiopica; in the EA articles full bibliographies will be found. Not listed here, but the articles in EA II on the various homilies (s.vv. “Dǝrsanä PN”) may also be mentioned.

Bausi, Alessandro. “Gädlä sämaʿǝtat.” EA II 644-646.

Colin, Gérard and Alessandro Bausi. “Sǝnkǝssar.” EA IV 621-623.

Getatchew Haile. “Gǝʿǝz literature.” EA II 736-741.

Habtemichael Kidane. “Mälkǝʾ.” EA III 700-702.

——–. “Mälkǝʾa gubaʾe.” EA III 704-705.

Huntingford, G.W.B. “The saints of mediaeval Ethiopia.” Abba Salama 10 (1979): 257-341.

Kaplan, Steven. “Gädl.” EA II 642-644.

——–. “Holy Men.” EA III 58-61.

Kinefe Rigb Zelleke. “Bibliography of the Ethiopic Hagiographical Tradition.” Journal of Ethiopian Studies 13 (1975): 57-102.

Mersha Alehegne. “Täzkar.” EA IV 881-882.

Nosnitsin, Denis. “Hagiography.” EA II 969-972.

——–. “Saints, Christian.” EA IV 476-480.

——–. “Sälam.” EA IV 484.

——–. “Täʾammǝr.” EA IV 787-788.

Samuel Yalew. “ʿArke.” EA I 342.

A note in a 13th-cent. manuscript on Dionysios bar Ṣalibi   Leave a comment

Saint Mark’s Monastery, Jerusalem, 48 is a big manuscript — 26.1x18x13.5 cm and about 600 folios — containing Dionysios bar Ṣalibi’s commentary on the Gospels, and a notable copy because it comes from only a century after the author’s death: the colophon (f. 588v) has the date Nisan 23, 1582 AG (= 1271 CE). Before the text itself begins on f. 1v, there is on the previous page a note in Garšūnī:

SMMJ 41, f. 1r

SMMJ 41, f. 1r

The note is not in the same hand of the manuscript’s scribe, and there is no explicit indication of its date, but it bears no marks of being recent. Here is a quickly done translation into English:

We found the date of this holy, venerated father, Mār Dionysios (that is Yaʿqub) bar Ṣalibi, recorded in the Chronicon [Ecclesiasticum] of St. Gregory Bar ʿEbrāyā, the fact that he was ordained bishop over Marʿaš by Athanasios the patriarch (that is, Yešuʿ b. Qaṭra). The ordination of Patriarch Athanasios was in the year 1450 AG (1138/9 CE), and the ordination of St. Dionysios bar Ṣalibi as bishop was in the year 1462 [AG, = 1150/1 CE]. This St. Dionysios was present at the ordination of St. Mār Michael the Great, Patriarch of Antioch, whose ordination was in the year 1478 AG [1166/7 CE] in the Monastery of Mār Barṣawmā. The eternal rest of St. Dionysios bar Ṣalibi was in Tešrin II [November] 1483 AG [= 1171 CE], and he was buried in the Church of the Virgin in Diyarbakır.

If you wish, you can read more about Dionysios bar Ṣalibi in:

  • Michael the Great’s Chronicle, Edessa-Aleppo Codex, ff. 349v-350v (outer columns; = pp. 701-703 in the Gorgias Press facsimile)
  • Bar ʿEbrāyā’s Chronicon [Ecclesiasticum] I 511-513, 559-561
  • Assemani, Bibliotheca Orientalis II 156-211
  • S.P. Brock, in GEDSH 126-127

The note above, which acknowledges Bar ʿEbrāyā as a source, apparently by an early reader, is a good example showing how manuscripts are not static objects serving merely as text-receptacles, but unique witnesses not only to this or that version of a particular text, but also to the scribes who copied them, their readers from generation to generation, and the communities that have curated them.

UPDATE: Thanks to Gabriel Rabo for pointing out a mistake in my translation due to eyeskip. It has now been corrected.

2012 in review   Leave a comment

hmml_patio_snow

Thanks to you all, dear readers, for a fun year at hmmlorientalia! Let’s hope for and do what we can to effect safety, well-being, friendship, and enjoyment of life, as we look forward to more manuscripts, texts, and languages in the one to come!

In 2012, in terms of manuscripts, I and other catalogers described several hundred manuscripts and identified several thousand distinct texts (I don’t have the exact numbers here before me), and it is our hope that this work will continue to be of use to those at work on the languages, literature, and manuscripts of Arabic/Garšūnī, Armenian, Gǝʿǝz, and Syriac. We have some exciting developments (including within vHMML) and announcements to look forward to in the coming year, so stay tuned!

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

4,329 films were submitted to the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. This blog had 18,000 views in 2012. If each view were a film, this blog would power 4 Film Festivals

Click here to see the complete report.

Posted December 31, 2012 by adamcmccollum in Uncategorized

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Fellowship for eastern Christian manuscript studies   1 comment

The recently established Dietrich Reinhart, OSB, Fellowship in Eastern Christian Manuscript Studies was announced not long ago on HMML’s website, but I thought it might be a good idea to share it again here. The original announcement is here, but for convenience and for broader distribution I also give the text here:

The Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) announces the establishment of the Dietrich Reinhart OSB Fellowship in Eastern Christian Manuscript Studies, to be awarded annually for three years beginning with the Academic Year 2013-2014. The fellowship has been established through the generosity of Rebecca Haile and Jean Manas of New York, New York, in memory of Br. Dietrich Reinhart OSB (1949-2008). Br. Dietrich, 11th President of Saint John’s University, was a visionary leader who saw HMML as integral to the mission of Saint John’s Abbey and University, and enthusiastically promoted HMML’s work in the Middle East, Ethiopia, and India.

Awardees must be undertaking research on some aspect of Eastern Christian studies requiring use of the digital or microfilm manuscript collections at HMML. They must have already been awarded a doctoral degree in a relevant field and have demonstrated expertise in the languages and cultures of Eastern Christianity relevant for their projects.

The Fellowship may be held for a full academic year (September 1-April 30) or for one semester (September 1-December 20; January 4-April 30). The Fellowship provides accommodation in an apartment at the Collegeville Institute on the Saint John’s University campus; working space at HMML; access to library, recreational and cultural activities at Saint John’s University; round-trip transportation; and a stipend of up to $25,000 for a full academic year. Stipends will be adjusted for less than a full year in residence.

Awardees will be expected to devote full attention to their research projects while in residence. They will also be expected to participate in a weekly seminar for Collegeville Institute resident scholars, to present their research in a public lecture sponsored by HMML, and to be a resource for HMML staff and other researchers during their stay.

Applicants are asked to provide: 1) a cover letter with current contact information and an indication of availability for a full-year or one-semester residency; 2) a description of the project to be pursued, including an explanation of how access to HMML’s resources will be important for its success (1000-1500 words); 3) an updated curriculum vitae; 4) two letters of reference.

The cover letter, project description, and CV should be sent by the applicant to hmmlfellowships@csbsju.edu; letters should be sent by the referees directly to the same email address or in hard copy to Julie Dietman, HMML, Box 7300, Collegeville, MN 56321.

Applications for the Academic Year 2013-14 are due December 15, 2012. The decision and acceptance process will be completed by the end of February 2013.

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