Syro-Georgian trisagion   8 comments

Among other uses of Syriac script for non-Syriac languages, we know well of Garšūnī (or Syro-Arabic) and even Syro-Armenian and Syro-Kurdish (especially the Lawij of Basilios Šemʕon al-Ṭūrānī), but I was surprised to find in my recent cataloging work a small example of Georgian written in Syriac script.* The text, which follows several pages of a grammatical list, is on one page of CCM 10 (olim Mardin 81) and it was not noted by Addai Scher, who cataloged the collection in the early twentieth century. It’s the trisagion (vel sim.: the Latin may be a garbled version of lines from this Easter hymn) in eight languages: Latin, Greek, Armenian, Georgian, Persian, Turkish, Arabic, and finally, Syriac. Much might be said about how these languages are represented in this short text, but here I’m only considering the Georgian part, lines 13-14 below.

CCM 10 = Mardin 81, f. 8r

CCM 10 = Mardin 81, f. 8r

The Georgian trisagion (words, transliteration, and ET here) is:

წმინდაო ღმერთო,
წმინდაო ძლიერო,
წმინდაო უკვდავო,
შეგვიწყალენ ჩვენ.

There are many recordings available of the hymn: here is one:

The noun “God” and the adjectives are all in the vocative case, and in the last line we have the verb შეწყალება, which might be analyzed as

შე-გვ-ი-წყალ-ე-ნ
PV-1PL.OBJ-CV-have.mercy-AOR.IMP-PL

There are several occurrences of the imperative ἐλέησον (with first or third person objects) in the Gospels, and so we can look among the Old Georgian versions to see how else the phrase is translated. Here are a few, all from the Adishi version:

  • Mt 9:27, 20:30 მიწყალენ ჩუენ
  • Mt 15:22 შემიწყალე მე
  • Mt 17:15 შეიწყალე ძჱ ჩემი
  • Mt 20:31 გჳწყალენ ჩუენ
  • Lk 17:13 შეგჳწყალენ ჩუენ

The last one, also with 1pl object, is different from the trisagion form only in orthography. The form from Mt 9:27 and 20:30 is built on the same root, but without the preverb შე- and with the 1st person marker მ- instead of გუ- (or variations thereof). The form in Mt 20:31 also has no preverb, but (allowing for the slight orthographic difference) it has the same 1pl markers as in the triasagion form. Finally, those in Mt 15:22 and 17:15 do have the preverb, and given their objects — 1sg and the 3rd person object “my son”, respectively — these forms look exactly as we would expect, the objects marked by -მ- in the first case and -∅- in the second, and naturally without the final -ნ to mark a plural object.

If we compare this Georgian text with the Syriac script above, we find the latter to be muddled. Recognizable to some degree are წმინდაო (Syr. zmyndʔ), ღმერთო (ʔwmrtw), ძლიერო (zryzw), and უკვდავო (ʔwkwdš), but that’s all I can see. While the Syriac letters are hardly as fitting for Georgian as the Georgian alphabet itself is, even with Syriac one might have gotten closer than the orthography in this example. What is the source of the confusion? Did this scribe write these lines from something he heard or knew himself? Did he copy from another written source also in Syriac letters?

I would be happy to hear about any other examples of Georgian written in Syriac letters, but I suspect it is a rare phenomenon.

* Thanks for their comments to Hidemi Takahashi and Nathan Chase, with whom I discussed this text a little.

Advertisements

8 responses to “Syro-Georgian trisagion

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. Interesting..

  2. Fascinating! I have not seen this.

  3. Adam, I forgot to mention this the other day, and it’s not Georgian in Syriac chatacters, but there is an Armenian manuscript that has the Trisagion in Greek, Georgian, Syriac and Persian, all in Armenian characters (Erevan, Matenadaran, 4618, fol. 126). You’ll find the details (if you can find the book in the first place) in Andrea Schmidt, “Arménien et syriaque”, in C. Mutafian (ed.), Arménie : la magie de l’écrit [exposition, Marseille, Centre de la vieille charité, 27 avril-22 juillet 2007], Paris, 2007, p. 345–348.

  4. Indeed the Armenian manuscripts Erevan, Matenadaran no 4618 and 7117 contain small Georgian texts in Armenian letters. Ms 4618, fol. 126 the Georgian trisagion, and Ms 7117 the names of the Georgian alphabet and again the Georgian trishagion (same transcription as in 4618) in Armenian script. The texts are also mentionned in the article of J. den Heijer – A. Schmidt, “Scripts beyond borders: Allographic traditions and their social, cultural and philological aspects. An analytical introduction”, in: J. den Heijer – A. Schmidt – T. Pataridze (eds), Scripts Beyond Borders. A Survey of Allographic Traditions in the Euro-Mediterranean World, (Publications de l’Institut Orientaliste de Louvain, 62), Louvain-la-Neuve 2013, pp. 1-63.

  5. Pingback: Trisagion in Turkish (Syriac script) | hmmlorientalia

  6. Pingback: The Georgian Alphabet and the Arabic Alphabet | georgiasomethingyouknowwhatever

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: